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HOW TO DETOX YOUR BEAUTY ROUTINE

Exposure to Chemicals

The average woman slathers, lathers, scrubs, rubs and sprays 515 different synthetic chemicals on her body each day – according to research in 2009 by Bionsen. More recently local Beauty Development Chemist Amanda from Realize Beauty counted 250 in a DIY.  That’s still a lot of chemicals to absorb over a life time.

On top of that we eat at least 10kg lipstick in a lifetime! That’s what got me into the Beauty Kitchen creating Lip Nourish as most lipstick are made from petroleum based oils, silicones, synthetic fragrances and colours.  Who wants to digest those ingredients. And, again and again toxic metals are found in everyday lipsticks (the bright reds are more susceptible) Ref: Berkeley: Poison Lips: Troubling levels of toxic metals found in cosmetics . [Update 15/7/13 Today Tonight covers Toxic Beauty Ingredients]

The sad fact is, most people have no idea that ingredients in makeup and skin care products can be harmful to their health…..until something happens.

But that is starting to change, you can begin now to detox your beauty routine

Where to begin?

10 steps to take charge of your health and beauty from the outside in….

1.    Watch the Story of Cosmetics. You’ll be amazed.

2.     Visit the Campaign for Safe Cosmetics It’s a NFP launched in 2004 to protect the health of consumers and workers by securing the corporate, regulatory and legislative reforms necessary to eliminate dangerous chemicals from cosmetics and personal care products.

3.     Take a look at the EWG’s Skin Deep Cosmetic Safety Database, the worlds largest and most popular product safety guide. Skin Deep assesses 68,000 personal care products using the most reputable science sources, and assigns each product a score from 0-10 (10 is most toxic).

4.    Look at your products ingredient statements. Decide how clean you want to go. Remember, stress is beauty’s enemy so be reasonable – change your products on your own terms, on finding similar performing offers and within your budget. Remember you have heaps of products: your make up purse, face care products, body balms, hand creams, deodorant, shampoo and conditioner, exfoliators, toothpaste, nail polish, hand wash, body wash or soap.

5.    Eliminate products that contain ingredients on David Suzuki’s Dirty Dozen or choose the Dirty Thirty basic starter list by Teens Turning Green. If you are still confused about toxic ingredients take a look at this blog on Chemical of the Day. I’m guessing if you have got this far you are pretty serious about your body so download the App ($7.50) for the Chemical Maze – Complete Ed. by Bill Statham. It’s your goto guide for cosmetics ingredients and food additives in Australia.

6.    Be careful when buying. Check the ingredient statements and if they are not disclosed online or on pack – don’t buy it – they are most likely hiding something.

7.    Simplify your beauty routine and discard the age old advice that we need to use so many products:  cleansers, toners, serums, day an night moisturisers, separate products for eyes and lips and hands and body…..!   I gave up soap / body wash on all but my †˜private parts’ over a decade ago and only use a cleanser if I have worn a tinted moisturiser…and that is not very often!

8.    Start to make some of your own products Eg All over Body Moisturising oil rich in omega 3 + skin nourishing oils to use in the shower or a brown sugar scrub. Saves time and money and you’ll never have dry skin again.

9.    Have a look at your make up – what items do you use constantly? Foundation/tint/BB cream, lip sticks, balms and glosses, mascara, start making changes with the †˜highest’ impacting products.

10. Find products that work and you’ll love – look for product reviews that you trust, read recommendations and testimonials from users. Jump into a beauty forum. Ask for samples.

For more information search our site for blog posts that will keep you up to date to make your transition to natural and organic beauty products a little easier.

Try my 3 day BEAUTY DETOX

Day 1  Detox Foods

Day 2  Detox Beauty Products

Day 3 Detox Destress

super skin food

Skinfood Nutrients

Skinfood Nutrients

There is an overwhelming array of information on what role nutrients have related to health. It’s harder to find out their role in all things beauty. For this reason I have compiled this table for you to understand what key food active nutrients do and what to eat if you have an ailment such as dry skin, pimples or feel wrinkles are †˜eating you up’.

Skinfood Nutrient

Role in Supporting Beauty Deficiency Delicious & Best Food Sources
Vitamin A Plays a role in preventing dry skin, blemishes and acne. Stimulates collagen and base layer of skin cells production for smoother more radiant appearance. Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties enhance appearance of skin and degeneration of ageing. Healthy eyes and keen vision! Wrinkle formation, dry, scaly or rough skin including blemishes and goose like pimples on upper arms etc. Thickening of skin on palms and soles. Increased risk of infection. Consumer both animal and plant sources together with zinc rich foods to get the most out. Liver, beef, orange fruits and vegetables – pumpkin, carrots, rockmelon, dried apricots, sweet potatoes, dark leafy greens – kale and spinach.
Vitamin B Complex Consists of the 8 vitamins: essential for breakdown of carbohydrates, fats and proteins for energy. Energy is essential for cell division and growth. Assists protein synthesis (collagen, keratin and elastin). Helps make blood and provides oxygen to help cells absorb nutrients more efficiently. Acne, dermatitis, Inflammation, blotchy pigmentation, skin cracking, dermatitis, lines and wrinkles. Cracks and sores around the mouth. Richest sources are meat, fish and dairy products, cereals (fortified), dark leafy greens, legumes and grains.
Vitamin C Powerful antioxidant that fights free radicals. Can prevent skin damage and reduce the aging effects of chemicals, cigarette smoke, sun damage and inflammation. Essential for collagen synthesis to maintain the cells structure to keep skin plump and smooth. Wrinkles, sagging skin. Bruises easily and takes longer to heal. Sun damage. Citrus, kiwi fruit, tomatoes, dark leafy greens – kale, fresh herbs, red capsicum, strawberries. Water soluble, thus body cannot retain VC reserves and needs to consume frequently.
Vitamin D Important in maintaining immune system health. Skin infection and disease. Best consumed via sun however oily fish, egg yolks contain small amounts
Vitamin E Major antioxidant, minimises fine lines and wrinkles by protecting collagen and elastin from free radical damage. Keeps skin fats healthy (free of oxidation), provides barrier to slow moisture loss to keep skin soft and smooth. Mild UV protection. May help with wound healing or dry cracked skin. Dry, cracked, sagging or wrinkled skin. Sun damage. Sun spots. Sunflower seeds, almonds, leafy greens – spinach, pine nuts, peanuts, apricots, wheat germ, avocado.
Vitamin K Helps to preserve elastin in skin cells so skin remains tight, bounces back when pressed and doesn’t wrinkle. Helps to minimise discoloration such as bruising, under-eye darkness  (works with Vitamins and C) and even spider veins. Sagging, soft, wrinkled skin. Deficiencies mostly arise from problems effecting the absorption of vitamin K not a lack of the vitamin itself. Green leafy vegetable: kale and spinach are the richest source. Greenpeas. Broccoli. Brussel Sprouts (all the brassica family) high levels. Absorption is enhanced when accompanied by vegetable oils. Heat stable. Freezing destroys.
Calcium Supports new cell production – clear blemishes and helps tired skin revitalise. Helps generate sebum which maintains healthy skin moisture levels keeping it soft, smooth and hydrated skin. Associated with eczema and brittle nails. May appear dry, thin and fragile Green leafy veggies – Kale & broccoli, dairy, sesame & flax seeds, tofu, brazil nuts and almonds.Needs magnesium to wor.
Copper Stimulates collagen and elastin formation. Reduces skins resilience and ability to heal. Damage to blood vessels. Organ meats (especially liver), seafood – molluscs, nuts- cashews, seeds – sesame, pumpkin & sunflower, cocoa powder.
Chromium Helps maintain blood sugar levels, improves circulation and allows energy to be extracted from macro nutrients for healthy glowing skin. Poor circulation, dull skin. Egg yolk, meats, broccoli, green beans, mushrooms and whole-grain products, particularly bran cereals.
Cysteine amino acid Assists in promoting healthy skin elasticity and texture. Necessary for protein building, cell division and skin repair. Poultry, yoghurt, egg yolks, capsicum, garlic, onion, broccoli, oats
Folate Required for energy production in skin cells to upkeep daily repairs. Blotchy pigmentation and skin cracking Spinach, lentils, citrus and papaya
Iron Collagen production to keep your skin tight and smooth; Promotes oxygenation of blood for rosy complexion, healthy immune system and energy production. Reduces the skins ability to regenerate & repair. Pale and anaemic. Beans & lentils, nuts and seeds, green leafy vegetables, wheat germ and whole wheat cereals, eggs.
Magnesium Enzyme activator enabling utilisation of key antioxidants and production of collagen. Premature Ageing Pumpkin & watermelon seeds, brazil nuts, almonds, cashews, soy beans, wheat germ and bran.
Manganese Plays a role in formation of connective tissue. Major component of enzymes. Promotes oxygenation of blood for rosy complexion. Reduces the skins ability to regenerate & repair. Pale and anaemic. Inflammation. Seeds, cacao beans, spinach, brazil nuts, almonds, kale,
Potassium Skin moisturising by playing vital role in balancing fluids –inc waste elimination and cell regeneration. Dry skin, dull. Avocado, spinach, broccoli, banana
Selenium Preserves elasticity of tissue Premature ageing Brazil nuts. Oily fish, meat and poultry, sunflower seeds, grains – wheat germ, barley, brown rice and oats.
Silicon /Silica Known as a youth mineral. Promotes tissue firmness; strengthens nails, skin, hair; maintains skin elasticity. Poor skin quality – thinning of skin, lack of strength. Brittle nails and hair. Cucumbers (leave skin on), red capsicum, greens, asparagus, tomatoes, leeks, beans, strawberries and oats, alfalfa, radish, rhubarb, mango.
Sulphur †œmost beautifying nutrient’. Promotes radiance and healthy skin – synthesis of key enzymes and liver functions. Needed for collagen and keratin production giving cells strength, flexibility and elasticity. Skin problems – eczema, psoriasis and rashes. Dull complexion, brittle nails & hair including poor growth. Brassicas – cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, brussel sprouts. Alliums – onions, shallots, garlic, leek, animal and dairy products, flax and sunflower seeds.
Zinc Essential for great skin complexion. Helps heal wounds; needed for collagen production, cell repair and production of DNA, RNA & enzymes (esp. the powerful anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant enzyme super oxide dismutase (SOD)) Acne, Dull skin, premature aging, scars, rashes, delayed wound healing, skin disorders. Animal produce: poultry, lean meats and oysters. Poppy, pumpkin, sunflower & sesame seeds, pecans & cashews, pine nuts, macadamia nuts,  and whole grains like quinoa or just the germ of wheat.  Works synergistically with Vitamin A & E
dirty thirty chemicals

The Dirty Thirty Toxic Ingredients

The Dirty Thirty toxic ingredients in Beauty Products

This list has been compiled by Teens Turning Green, (down load and print the pdf)  it is an excellent reference source.

Chemicals to avoid found in the product we use daily.

1. C H E M I CA L : A L U M I N U M  Z I R C O N I U M  a n d  OT H E R  A LU M I N U M  C O M P O U N D S

Function: Used to control sweat and odour in the underarms by slowing

down the production of sweat.

Present in: Antiperspirants. Banned by EU.

Health concerns: Linked to the development of Alzheimer’s Disease; may

be linked to breast cancer; probable neurotoxin; respiratory, and

developmental toxin.

2. C H E M I CA L : B E N Z Y L AC E TAT E

Function: Solvent; hidden within †œfragrance.†

Present in: Many cosmetics and personal care products, read labels.

Health concerns: Linked to pancreatic cancer; easily absorbs into skin

causing quick systemic effects; animal studies show hyperaemia of the lungs;

possible gastrointestinal, liver, and respiratory toxicant; possible neurotoxin.

2. C H E M I CA L : B E N Z A LKO N I U M C H LO R I D E a n d B E N Z E T H O N I U M C H LO R I D E

Function: Antimicrobial agent, deodorant, preservative, biocide.

Present in: Moisturizer, sunscreen, facial cleanser, acne treatment, pain

relief. Restricted in Japan and Canada.

Health concerns: Immune system toxicant; may trigger asthma; possible

organ system toxicant; animal studies show endocrine disruption and brain,

nervous system, respiratory and blood effects; possible carcinogen.

3. C H E M I CA L : B R O N O P O L

Function: Preservative.

Present in: Moisturizer, body wash, facial cleanser, makeup remover,

anti-aging products. Restricted in Canada.

Health concerns: Immune system toxicant; lung and skin toxicant; animal

studies show endocrine disruption and gastrointestinal, brain and nervous

system effects; irritant.

4. C H E M I CA L : B U T Y L AC E TAT E

Function: Solvent in polishes and treatments, prevents chipping.

Present in: Nail polish and nail treatments.

Health concerns: Repeated exposure causes skin dryness and cracking;

vapours may induce drowsiness or dizziness; flammable.

5. C H E M I CA L : B U T Y L AT E D H Y D R OXY TO LU E N E (B HT)/ B UT YLATE D HYDROXYAN I SOLE (B HA)

Function: Anti-Oxidant; slows down the rate at which product ingredients

change in colour.

Present in: Many cosmetics and personal care products, read labels.

Banned by EU.

Health Concerns: Immune system toxicant; endocrine disruptor; probable

human carcinogen; animal studies show brain, liver, neurotoxin, reproductive

and respiratory toxicant.

6. C H E M I CA L : E T H OXY L AT E D I NG R E DI E NTS: CETEAR ETH / PEG COM POU N DS

Function: Surfactant, emulsifying or cleansing agent, penetration enhancer.

Present in: Many cosmetics and personal care products, read labels.

Health concerns: Animal studies show brain, nervous system and sense organ effects; irritant; reproductive and skin toxin, alters skin structure, allowing other chemicals to penetrate deep into the skin and increasing the amounts of other chemicals that reach the bloodstream; may contain harmful impurities.

7. C H E M I CA L : C OA L TA R

Function: Controls itching and eczema, softens and promotes the

dissolution of hard, scaly, rough skin, also used in hair dyes.

Present in: Shampoo and Hair Dye. Banned by Canada and EU.

Health concerns: Known human carcinogen; skin and respiratory toxicant.

8. C H E M I CA L : C O CA M I D E D E A / L AU R A M I D E D E A

Function: used as foaming agents in shampoos and bath products, and as

emulsifying agents in cosmetics; foaming and cleansing agents for †œmouth feel.†

Present in: Many cosmetics and personal care products, read labels.

Health concerns: Human immune system toxicant; forms carcinogenic nitrosamine compounds if mixed with nitrosating agents; animal studies show sense organ effects and skin irritation; may contain harmful impurities.

9. C H E M I CA L : D I E T H A N O L A M I N E ( D E A )

Function: pH adjuster.

Present in: Sunscreen, moisturizer, foundation, hair colour.

Health concerns: Skin and immune system toxicant; possible carcinogen;

irritant; animal studies show endocrine disruption and neuro developmental,

brain and nervous system effects; may trigger asthma.

10. C H E M I CA L : E T H Y L AC E TAT E

Function: Solvent.

Present in: Nail polish products, mascara, tooth whitening, perfume.

Health concerns: Probable neurotoxin; possible nervous system toxin;

possible carcinogen; irritant; highly flammable

11. C H E M I CA L : F O R M A LD E H Y D E

Function: Disinfectant, germicide, fungicide, preservative.

Present in: Deodorant, nail polish, soap, shampoo, shaving cream.

Restricted in Canada. Banned by EU.

Health concerns: Immune system, respiratory, haematological, and skin

toxicant; probable carcinogen and cardiovascular toxicant; can damage DNA;

may trigger asthma; animal studies show sense organ, brain, and nervous

system effects; possible human development toxicant.

12. C H E M I CA L : F O R M A LD E H Y D E – R E LE A S I N G

P R E S E R VAT I V E S ( Q UAT E R N I U M – 1 5 , D M D M

H Y DA N TO I N , D I A Z O LI D I N Y L U R E A A N D

I M I DA Z O LI D I N Y L U R E A )

Function: Anti-microbial preservative.

Present in: Many cosmetics and personal care products, read labels.

Health concerns: Same as Formaldehyde. May contain harmful

impurities.

13. C H E M I CA L : F R AG R A N C E ( PA R F U M )

Function: Deodorant, masking, perfuming

Present in: Many cosmetics and personal care products, read labels.

Health concerns: Immune system toxicant; possible neurotoxin; can

contain between 10 and 300 different chemicals, many of which have never

been tested for safety; see phthalates. Labelling can be confusing. If uncertain,

check with manufacturer.

14. C H E M I CA L : H Y D R O Q U I N O N E

Function: Antioxidant, fragrance ingredient, skin bleaching agent, hair

colorant.

Present in: Skin fading/lightener, facial moisturizer, anti-aging, sunscreen,

hair colour, facial cleanser and moisturizer. Restricted in Canada.

Health concerns: Immune system and respiratory toxicant; probable

neurotoxin; possible carcinogen; irritant; animal studies show endocrine

disruption.

15. C H E M I CA L : I O D O P R O PY N Y L

B U T Y LCA R B A M AT E

Function: Preservative.

Present in: Many cosmetics and personal care products, read labels.

Restricted in Japan.

Health concerns: Human toxicant; possible liver immune system toxin;

16. C H E M I CA L : LE A D a n d LE A D C O M P O U N D S

Function: Colorant.

Present in: Hair dye, hair products. Traces found in some red lipstick.

Restricted in Canada.

Health concerns: Probable carcinogen; developmental, respiratory,

gastrointestinal and reproductive toxicant; reduced fertility; animal studies

show metabolic, brain and nervous system effects; suspected nano-scale

ingredients with potential to absorb into the skin

17. C H E M I CA L : M E T H Y LI S OT H I A Z O LI N O N E

( M I / M C I ) a n d

M E T H YC H LO R O I S OT H I A Z O LI N O N E

Function: Preservative.

Present in: Many cosmetics and personal care products, read labels.

Restricted in Canada and Japan.

Health concerns: Immune system toxicant; animal studies show restricted

growth of the axons and dendrites of immature nerves, neurotoxicity and

positive mutation results; can lead to a malfunction in the way neurons

communicate with each other; especially detrimental to a developing

nervous system.

18. C H E M I CA L : OXY B E N Z O N E

( B E N Z O P E N O N E – 3 )

Function: Sunscreen Agent; Ultraviolet Light Absorber; UV Absorber; UV

Filter.

Present in: Sunscreens.

Health concerns: Associated with photo allergic reactions and

immunotoxicity. Probable carcinogen and endocrine disruptor; Enhanced

skin absorption and bio accumulates to dangerous levels; biochemical cellular

changes. Developmental and reproductive toxicity.

19. C H E M I CA L : PA R A B E N S ( M E T H Y L , E T H Y L ,

P R O PY L A N D B U T Y L )

Function: Preservative and anti-bacterial agent.

Present in: Many cosmetics and personal care products, read labels.

Health concerns: May alter hormone levels, possibly increasing risk for

certain types of cancer, impaired fertility, or alteration of the development of

a foetus or young child; studies have found parabens in breast tumours;

probable skin toxicant; animal studies show brain and nervous system effects.

20. C H E M I CA L : P E T R O L AT U M

Function: Forms barrier on skin; makes lipsticks shine and creams

smoother; inexpensive skin softener.

Present in: Many cosmetics and personal care products, read labels. Banned

by EU.

Health concerns: May be contaminated with impurities, linked to cancer

or other significant health problems.

21.C H E M I CA L : P H T H A L AT E S ( D I B U T Y L

P H T H A L AT E S )

Function: Fragrance ingredient, plasticizer, solvent.

Present in: Many cosmetics and personal care products, read labels. Banned

in EU.

Health concerns: Immune system toxicant; developmental and

reproductive toxin; respiratory toxicant; probable neurotoxin; possible

carcinogen and endocrine disruptor; bio-accumulative in wildlife.

22. C H E M I CA L : P – P H E N Y LE N E D I A M I N E ( P P D )

Function: Hair colorant.

Present in: Hair dye, shampoo, hair spray. Restricted in Canada.

Health concerns: Immune system and respiratory toxicant; probable

neurotoxin; eczema; possible nervous system, skin, kidney and liver toxicant;

irritant; may trigger asthma and gastritis; shown to cause cancer in animal

studies.

allergenic.

23. C H E M I CA L : P R O PY LE N E G LYC O L

Function: Solvent, penetration enhancer, conditions skin, controls viscosity

and keeps products from melting in high or freezing when it is cold.

Present in: Many cosmetics and personal care products, read labels.

Health concerns: Alters skin structure, allowing other chemicals to

penetrate deep into the skin and increasing the amounts of other chemicals

that reach the bloodstream; animal studies show reproductive effects, positive

mutation results, brain and nervous system effects and endocrine disruption.

24. C H E M I CA L : S O D I U M L AU R E T H S U LFAT E /

S O D I U M L AU RY L S U LFAT E

Function: Cleansing and foaming agent – Surfactant, emulsifying agent,

penetration enhancer.

Present in: Many cosmetics and personal care products, read labels.

Health concerns: Alters skin structure, allowing other chemicals to

penetrate deep into the skin, increasing the amounts of other chemicals that

reach the bloodstream; Irritant; Hormone disruptor. May cause hair

follicle, skin and eye damage.

25. C H E M I CA L : TA LC

Function: Absorbs moisture, anti-caking agent, bulking agent.

Present in: Blush, powder, eye shadow, baby powder, deodorant.

Health concerns: Carcinogen; link between talcum powder and ovarian

cancer; talc particles are similar to asbestos particles and data suggests that it

can cause tumours in the lungs; probable respiratory toxin.

26. C H E M I CA L : TO LU E N E

Function: Antioxidant, solvent to improve adhesion and gloss.

Present in: Nail polish and hair dye.

Health concerns: Liver toxin; probable developmental, nervous system and

respiratory toxin; possible cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, renal and sense

organ toxin; possible carcinogen and reproductive toxin; irritant; highly

flammable.

27. C H E M I CA L : T R I C LO S A N

Function: Anti-bacterial agent, deodorant, preservative, biocide. Reduces

and controls bacterial contamination on the hands and on treated products.

Present in: Antibacterial soaps, deodorants, toothpastes, mouthwashes, face

wash and cleaning supplies. Restricted in Japan and Canada.

Health concerns: Probable endocrine disrupter and carcinogen; easily

bio-accumulates to dangerous levels; irritant; animal studies show

reproductive and other broad systematic effects; potentially contaminated

with impurities linked to cancer and other significant health problems.

28. C H E M I CA L : T R I E T H A N A LO M I N E ( T E A )

Function: Fragrance ingredient, pH adjuster, surfactant.

Present in: Hand & body lotion, shaving creams, soap, shampoo, bath

powders and moisturizer.

Health concerns: Immune system toxicant; possible carcinogen; animal

studies show endocrine disruption; may trigger asthma; forms carcinogenic

nitrosamine compounds if mixed with nitrosating agents.

29. C H E M I CA L : 1 . 4 D I OX A N E

Function: Penetration enhancer

 Present in: body lotion, moisturisers, sunless tanning products, baby soap,

anti ageing products.

 Health concerns: EPA classifies it as a probable human carcinogen found

in 46 of 100 personal care products marketed as organic or natural, and the .

National Toxicology Program considers it a known animal carcinogen Acute

(short-term) inhalation exposure to high levels of 1,4-dioxane has caused

vertigo, drowsiness, headache, anorexia and irritation of the eyes, nose,

throat, and lungs in humans. It may also irritate the skin.

Where to start

I have compiled a 10 step list to help you make the transition from chemical laden personal care products to clean beauty. Read more 

hazardous beauty ingredients

Hazardous & Toxic Beauty Ingredients

Hazardous and Toxic beauty ingredients

Your skin absorbs chemicals.

Medical Doctor, Nancy Lonsdorf, says †œas much as 60% of topical skin-care products are absorbed through the skin and into the bloodstream, they should be consumed with the same prudence that we use to choose our breakfast cereal†.

We can no longer view the skin as an impermeable shield: what goes on goes in. Nicotine & medical patches have been designed to dose their active ingredients through your skin. It is a permeable barrier subject to the toxicity of the ingredients we bath it in.

Armed with this knowledge you can steer clear of harmful, irritating, hormone disrupting and cancer causing products.  And the happy flip side is you can feed your skin from the outside in!

DAily Mail Hazardous Beauty ingredients

Image source  from www.dailymail.co.uk

I will keep you up to date and try to help you navigate this mindfield of information via posts. Please remember ‘stress’ is one of the worst ‘de-beautifiers’ so just embrace this change with a positive and open mind as if you are going on a new trip!   To begin and stay in the loop, start here .

How to detox your beauty routine

How to detox your beauty routine

How to detox your beauty routine

Exposure to Chemicals

The average woman slathers, lathers, scrubs, rubs and sprays 515 different synthetic chemicals on her body each day – according to research in 2009 by Bionsen. More recently local Beauty Development Chemist Amanda from Realize Beauty counted 250 in a DIY.  That’s still a lot of chemicals to absorb over a life time.

On top of that we eat at least 10kg lipstick in a lifetime! That’s what got me into the Beauty Kitchen creating Lip Nourish as most lipstick are made from petroleum based oils, silicones, synthetic fragrances and colours.  Who wants to digest those ingredients. And, again and again toxic metals are found in everyday lipsticks (the bright reds are more susceptible) Ref: Berkeley: Poison Lips: Troubling levels of toxic metals found in cosmetics . [Update 15/7/13 Today Tonight covers Toxic Beauty Ingredients]

The sad fact is, most people have no idea that ingredients in makeup and skin care products can be harmful to their health…..until something happens.

But that is starting to change, you can begin now to detox your beauty routine

Where to begin?

10 steps to take charge of your health and beauty from the outside in….

1.    Watch the Story of Cosmetics. You’ll be amazed.

2.     Visit the Campaign for Safe Cosmetics It’s a NFP launched in 2004 to protect the health of consumers and workers by securing the corporate, regulatory and legislative reforms necessary to eliminate dangerous chemicals from cosmetics and personal care products.

3.     Take a look at the EWG’s Skin Deep Cosmetic Safety Database, the worlds largest and most popular product safety guide. Skin Deep assesses 68,000 personal care products using the most reputable science sources, and assigns each product a score from 0-10 (10 is most toxic).

4.    Look at your products ingredient statements. Decide how clean you want to go. Remember, stress is beauty’s enemy so be reasonable – change your products on your own terms, on finding similar performing offers and within your budget. Remember you have heaps of products: your make up purse, face care products, body balms, hand creams, deodorant, shampoo and conditioner, exfoliators, toothpaste, nail polish, hand wash, body wash or soap.

5.    Eliminate products that contain ingredients on David Suzuki’s Dirty Dozen or choose the Dirty Thirty basic starter list by Teens Turning Green. If you are still confused about toxic ingredients take a look at this blog on Chemical of the Day. I’m guessing if you have got this far you are pretty serious about your body so download the App ($7.50) for the Chemical Maze – Complete Ed. by Bill Statham. It’s your goto guide for cosmetics ingredients and food additives in Australia.

6.    Be careful when buying. Check the ingredient statements and if they are not disclosed online or on pack – don’t buy it – they are most likely hiding something.

7.    Simplify your beauty routine and discard the age old advice that we need to use so many products:  cleansers, toners, serums, day an night moisturisers, separate products for eyes and lips and hands and body…..!   I gave up soap / body wash on all but my †˜private parts’ over a decade ago and only use a cleanser if I have worn a tinted moisturiser…and that is not very often!

8.    Start to make some of your own products Eg All over Body Moisturising oil rich in omega 3 + skin nourishing oils to use in the shower or a brown sugar scrub. Saves time and money and you’ll never have dry skin again.

9.    Have a look at your make up – what items do you use constantly? Foundation/tint/BB cream, lip sticks, balms and glosses, mascara, start making changes with the †˜highest’ impacting products.

10. Find products that work and you’ll love – look for product reviews that you trust, read recommendations and testimonials from users. Jump into a beauty forum. Ask for samples.

For more information search our site for blog posts that will keep you up to date to make your transition to natural and organic beauty products a little easier.

Try my 3 day BEAUTY DETOX

Day 1  Detox Foods

Day 2  Detox Beauty Products

Day 3 Detox Destress

eating for beauty

Eating for Beauty

Eating for Beauty

How to:

It’s easy to start eating for beauty, it not a separate diet, it’s for you and for your family, it’s a way of life.

1. Make over your pantry. See what ingredients we recommend over here. Get familiar with the foods and ingredients you should be avoiding: use my SWAP philosophy + think CLEAN. Don’t forget to download the Chemical Maze APP to avoid the nasty additives (#’s). See the worst culprits list. Establish your providors, where you go shopping – the supermarket, F&V shop, organic markets, butcher. Clean out your pantry, label the jars, just do it section by section, in your own time and budget. Squeal with excitement when finished. Clean out and re-organise your fridge.

2. Build your recipe repertoire. Remove the stress of †˜what am I going to cook’. Create a list or file of go-to recipes you and your family love that you know feed your body. Put a little whiteboard on the fridge with the days of the week and who will be home when so you can fill what you will cook most nights. I do it AFTER I have been shopping as that way I can take advantage of what is in season and what is on special. I also do it on a Sunday or Monday evening so the week is on order. Get inspiration from my recipe section.

3. Create a fail proof net. Remove the tempters.

  1. Set up your juicing corner – a pile of fresh veggies, fruits and jars filled with beauty-boosting oils and proteins (bowl of home laid eggs in my case), your machine of choice.
  2. To prevent you running out of beauty food and compromising what you eat, have †˜preserved but clean’ ingredients on hand to use – jars of organic passata or baby beet, cans of tuna (in 100% olive oil or water – caught sustainably), cherry tomatoes or chickpeas, pasture fed meat already portioned in the freezer, frozen organic berries in case the fruit basket has run low).
  3. Set aside 1-2 hrs to bake and prep each week, a regular time to shop so there is always food on hand. Make or buy a †˜side’ or condiment every week or so – a hummus, or pesto, or fresh egg mayo, or roast capsicum relish, or tomato jam or lemon curd to spice up your meal.
  4. Have lots of food choices on hand at any one time to remove boredom, encourage inspiration. (eg different quinoa, varieties of rice – jasmine, red, brown, flours to bake with – buckwheat, oat, spelt, lots of different nuts in various forms – slithered, whole, chopped, flaked)

4. Continue to try new foods, cook new dishes and experiment. Slowly add new ideas to your repertoire. Take a hero ingredient and think what can I do with it? On your weekly planning board just pop the hero ingredient on it and then embark on what to cook at that time by looking thru your fridge and pantry to get ideas on what to do.  Get your family to embrace new foods and meals – don’t compromise. Put up with your kids negativity, by the time you serve it the third time….they are won over. (with a few exceptions)

5. Get familiar with what’s in food. See what beauty nutrients are in fruits & vegetables, what they do for our skin, hair and nails and get tips and tricks on how to prepare them. Click her for the Beauty Food Glossary.

CLEAN BEAUTY GUIDES

Clean Beauty Guides

Find handy and detailed information on how to make the transition to natural beauty and living a more healthy, energised life.


 

How To Detox Your Beauty Routine

Most people have no idea that ingredients in make up and skin care products can be harmful to their health…..until something happens. Read my 10 steps to take charge of your health and beauty from the outside in.

Hazardous Beauty Ingredients

Steer clear of harmful, irritating, hormone disrupting and cancer causing products. This image from the www.dailymail.co.uk shows you the most common toxic beauty ingredients.

The Dirty Thirty Chemicals Found In Everyday Beauty Products

Teens Turning Green have prepared this list of the 30 ingredients found in personal care and beauty products used daily.  Use this to check what you use.


 

Super Skin Food Nutrient Table

Discover what nutrients support beauty and where to find the best sources.

Eating for Beauty

How to eat yourself beautiful – where to start and what to do.

Pantry Make Over + Shopping List (pdf)

5 step guide to setting up your pantry to eat well.  Your beauty regime shouldn’t be confined to your bathroom.


 

Food Additives - A Practical Guide

History of food additives, what you should avoid and how to do it.

Kitchen Tools for Cooking Clean & Healthy Food

Essential equipment list for cooking healthy.

Introduction to Healthy, Beautiful Baking

How to healthify & beautify your baking to ensure nutrient dense, not-too-sweet and clean baked delicious goodies.


 

What To Expect Each Season - Beauty | Food | Life

See what to expect with each new season – from how to nurture your skin to what’s fresh in market and what’s good to do at this time of year.

My Beauty Manifesto

What I believe is the recipe for a naturally beautiful women.

Studies & Reports

These links provide access to some research studies and reports I know you find interesting – if you want to dig deeper.

beauty manifesto

Beautiful Woman Manifesto

Manifesto of a beautiful woman

I believe in natural beauty. In a woman who †˜writes her own story’.

She knows and understands what makes her smile every day, what she loves and is good at.

She is the interesting and interested one who oozes energy and passion to do things effortlessly.

She is the beautiful one.

My manifesto on beauty is simple, it’s gathered from years in business, being a mum and taking time to taste what ingredients make the best recipe!

1.      Be You. Why try to be someone who you cannot be? Have the inner strength to ignore what’s happening around you. Take inspiration from others, but cultivate your own beauty. No one can be free unless they are an individual.

2.      Nourish and Flourish. Eat well, live well, and be amazed at how wonderful you feel and how easy it is to get things done. Think about what you put on and in your body, the environment you live in and the products you use in your home, and garden. Remember the less processed it is the more natural and less toxic it is.

3.      Believe and Succeed. Have faith in yourself. Be ambitious, there is nothing wrong if you trip up. Do what you are good at and everything is easier. Pursue your dream…set deadlines, start!

4.       Make up. Not Cover Up. A touch of colour work wonders highlighting your features, it can boost your confidence and instantly †˜pick-you-up’, but don’t hide behind the †˜war paint’ or spend too long in the bathroom – there are better things to do!  There is nothing more attractive than a woman glowing with confidence, health and vitality.

5.    Starve stress: Work Smarter, Not Harder. Challenge the status quo of how we are conditioned to work. Style your life to live, work and play where ever you want, when you want. Don’t try to do everything and please everyone.

6.    Be Close to Nature. Close the green gap. Get back in touch with nature and be inspired by its beauty and goodness. Its food for the soul……escape, replenish and regenerate. Stay in balance.

7.    Surprise and Delight.Use you imagination in rich creative ways. Live the moment. Enjoy. Be different. Give joy.

What’s yours?

Cindy :)

2-luk beauty manifesto

Food Additives

How to Avoid Food Additives

How to Avoid Food Additives

 The rise of processed foods

Much of our food departed from its natural state when we started to demand convenience. This is an over simplistic view and forgive me.  From the late 60’s and early 70’s the role of stay-at-home-mum, the traditional family nurturer and house keeper began to loose its charm and with it women entered the work force in droves. With mum working and keeping house something had to change: hello fast food chains, hello convenience food.

She demanded food that was affordable, tasty and lasted so she didn’t have to shop every day. Food Manufacturers took care of that: they buy the ingredients, mince them up, make them uniform, extend with fillers, add lots of cheap salt or sugar a bit of flavor and there you have it. Targets are achieved: cost, yield, consistency, colour, moisture retention, mouth feel, nutrition profile and ingredients to match the packaging, preservatives to keep it longer – at ambient because it is cheaper to store and ship…..you get the picture. Again simplistic but it gave birth to the world of Additives – the whole 300+ of them we know today.

They are not all bad but alarmingly, the rates of diseases such as cancer, obesity, diabetes, autism, depression, asthma and ADHD have also increased dramatically over this time. Every year, Australians consume over 5kg of food additives each, yet how many of us really know what these additives do, which ones are safe and which ones are known to be harmful?

Not all food additives are bad and I know a fair bit about them having studied food science and working in New Product Development at Kitchens of Sara Lee.  Two years doing bench top develop development straight from university – yes the early 90’s! According to Julie Eady of Additives Alert †œAt least 60 food additives used in our foods are at best questionable in terms of safety, or at worse, known to be harmful…most of them are safe, well tested and pose no problem for most people.†

There is a constant battle between the food manufacturing industry and food regulatory body Food Standards Australia and New Zealand (FSANZ) with consumers + lobbying groups. See ACA Choice’s review How additives are regulated.

The bottom line is processed or packaged foods and additive go hand in hand. The more highly processed a food is the more additive you consume. The easiest way to avoid them is eating †˜real’ food or minimally processed (clean) foods that don’t need additives. Eg canned tomatoes or frozen peas but then we still need to have wits about ourselves to watch for toxic packaging materials or elevated salt levels or hydrogenated fats which are not covered by the Food Additives code.

Have I lost you yet?

Ultimately it’s the consumer who speaks the loudest …with their wallet. We are in an interesting time of change again when women have said enough is enough. They are choosing to work less hours or from home and they are concerned about what they are feeding their bodies and family. Women are making better choices, they are trying to find balance with work, with caring for their family, with nurturing themselves.

What to do:

1. Don’t eat foods with these numbers

–       Anything artificially coloured + some natural colours (codes numbers in the 100 range)

–       Preservatives (200 range)

–       Antioxidants (300 range)

–       Artificial Sweeteners (900 range + sorbitol 420)

–       Flavour Enhancers (mostly in the 620-640 range)

2.  Avoid most foods with these numbers

–       Mineral salts and anti-caking agents (500-585)

–       Thickeners, Emulsifiers & Stabilisers (mostly 400 range) – there are some ok ones like locust bean gum, agar agar etc but generally avoid.

3. Checking for numbers

Here are your options

a) Download the App Chemical Maze – Complete edition by Bill Statham. Aust. It’s your goto guide for food additives and cosmetics ingredients in Australia. Be mindful however of what I classify as the worst culprits tho

b) or Buy this Julie’s guide  http://www.additivealert.com.au/

She covers what food additives are, what’s safe and not, how additives are linked to health problems, how to read and understand a label, what’s considered unsafe but still used in Australia

c) Take a look at Tanya’s Additive free pantry http://www.additivefreepantry.com/

d) Research online, educate yourself.

e) Source, eat and cook beautiful, simple, fresh and wholefoods.  Your skin, body and family will love you. It takes time but it is a life long investment.

pantry make over

Pantry Makeover + Shopping List

Pantry Makeover + Shopping List

A beauty regime shouldn’t be confined to your bathroom…it should be part of your daily life. Think of your kitchen as the powerhouse for you to be delicious inside and out. A place filled with the food active goodies your body needs and craves for beautiful skin, lustrous hair, strong nails, endless energy and a lean body.

If you Cleanse, Tone and Moisturise your skin OUTSIDE IN now apply a similar beauty philosophy to your skin from the INSIDE OUT and Cleanse.Nourish.Hydrate.

How to make over your pantry with beautifood.

Your pantry and fridge is the go-to place for the foods to make meals and snack. Most of your goods should be real food – unprocessed whole foods, like spelt pasta, red rice, brown rice and quinoa, legumes, dried (preservative free) fruit and nuts, seeds, oils. –A good rule of thumb: Foods without ingredient lists or heavy-handed health claims on their packaging are the best choice. Those foods with short ingredient lists made up only of items you recognise and can pronounce are good, too. Many numbers are a no no and oils & sugars are a minefield, so take note below.

1. START WITH A CLEAN SWEEP

Step one. Sadly but necessary, you won’t be able to see what you’re working with until you’ve completely removed everything from your pantry. Clear out all your shelves of your pantry and get everything out on the counter where you can see it and deal with it. You don’t have to throw out everything that does not fit the beautifood mantra yet but it’s best to know what not to buy again and what needs to be swapped with a better choice when you shopping next time. By emptying your pantry, you may uncover a few hidden gems that you’d completely forgotten!

2. SORT AND PURGE

Step Two is to spend some time going through everything to see if it loosely fits within the †˜shopping list’ and to see what you’ve been squirrelling away. Mark the poorer choices with a black texta cross. Eg canola oil, or muesli bars, because I have a thrifty side – keep these til they are used up but don’t buy again.

Items you should also toss include:

      1. Dented cans
      1. Bags and boxes with rips or tears
      1. Spices older than one year
      1. Items that are expired
      1. Anything with an infestation (moths, weevils or ants!)

Inspect ingredient labels. 

Look for these controversial food additive culprits and remove as you work your way through:

Colours (code numbers in the 100 range) add or restore colour to foods.

Preservatives (200 range) ‘help protect against food deterioration’ caused by micro-organisms.

Antioxidants (300 range) slow or prevent the oxidative deterioration of foods, such as when fats and oils go rancid.

Artificial sweeteners (including intense sweeteners in the 900 range, and bulk sweeteners such as sorbitol, 420) chemicals that impart a sweet taste for fewer kilojoules than sugar.

Thickener & emulisfiers (mainly 400) there are some ok ones like locust bean gum.

Flavour Enhancers (mainly in the 600 range) ‘improve’ the flavour and/or aroma of food.

Target the undesirables.

Hydrogenated or highly processed polyunsaturated fats which contain anti-oxidants from the above list, GMOs (genetically modified), high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) – tho it is not used much in Australia, sugar as the 1st or 2nd ingredient + keep an eye out for where the total sugar content is more than 8%.  (eg many cereals and muesli bars)

Ditch the junk.

It’s just better that it is not in your kitchen to tempt you and you learn to find simpler, healthier choices including making your own. If you always have colourful salt and sugar laden packages handy for children to eat they will believe it is the food they should be eating and get accustomed to.

Bypass BPA. 

Notice how many cans containing BPA you have (especially anything with tomato) and next time you go shopping start buying only BPA-free brands or food that comes in glass jars instead. BPA is a hormone disrupting chemical known as bisphenol-A, a synthetic oestrogen.  Read more.

Check containers.

Choose glass, ceramic and stainless steel over plastic whenever possible. These materials are long-lasting, can often be transferred directly from the pantry or fridge to the oven or microwave, and – most importantly, they won’t leach chemicals into your food. Ikea have some fabulous economical jars that seal well and look smart. I love the Burken from IKEA .5l – 2.2l $3.99 to $9.99.

If you’re keeping some plastic around, purge anything marked with a recycling code No. 3 or 7 first. Those numbers are used to mark hard plastics that often have the hormone-disrupting chemical bisphenol-A.

If you’re using those Chinese food take-out containers to store your healthy, homemade leftovers, you’re definitely not doing yourself any favors! Look for glass or BPA-free plastic containers. And never microwave or reheat food in a plastic container, even if it says microwave safe.

Be understanding.

There is always a place for regular table sugar and wheat flour in baking (provides lightness and lift) so make better choices – organic and in the case of flour wholemeal too. It’s the way you use these ingredients that needs to be considered. Eg adding nutrient rich ingredients such almond flour or chia seeds to a pancake batter. See recipe

3. CATEGORISE

Once you’ve purged your pantry, categorise your remaining items as per The List below. Eg Grouping canned goods on one shelf and condiments on another, creating a baking centre and breakfast centre and so forth. I keep a section with all the snacks (crackers, nuts, dried fruits, home baking etc) accessible to the kids – just below the bowls of fresh fruit – not to mention tubs of cut carrots, celery and snow peas in the fridge on a low shelf. Keeping your pantry organised in this fashion will make it easier to identify the items you need when heading to the shops or making a meal.

4. CLEAN

Obviously, before restocking your pantry make sure you thoroughly clean out the space. Start at the top shelf and wipe down all surfaces with a warm, damp cloth, then dry the shelves completely. If any of your food containers are sticky or dusty, wipe them down before placing them back in the pantry. If you are like me ….once you put your goodies in to glass jars 1) you never have enough and 2) they don’t fit into the space you have. Hmmmm!

5. ORGANIZE

It’s one thing to clean out your pantry and get the right foods on the shelf; it’s another to keep it clean and organised. By putting in a little effort initially, you’ll save yourself the hassle down the road. Tubs for roots vegetables, shelf racks and under-shelf baskets can help you keep things in their place. Consider what you use and how often and place them that way too and don’t forget to date things if they have a short life. (like spices) Label the jars and pantry categories so your family will know where things are and where to replace supplies after using them. If you are like me grab some frosted stickers from Avery and a big thick black marker – otherwise get super stylish and visit Down That Little Lane or Etsy or Pinterest for gorgeous ideas. I had visions of using fancy blackboard labels and those chalk pens but ……another time.

Shopping List

This downloadble master list gives you ideas on what to foods to stock in your pantry and what foods, by default to avoid.

Pantry Polish shopping list